Willing To Do Anything For That Job? Think Again.

POSTED BY SUDY BHARADWAJ ON OCT 11, 2012 IN BLOG, JOB SEARCH | 4 COMMENTS

“I’m willing to do anything for this job.” Does this sound like you in your job search? If your answer is yes, it’s time for a reality check.

You may think being willing to do anything will help you appear flexible and willing to learn, and you could be right. But it’s more likely it will make you appear desperate and unqualified. Here’s why you shouldn’t say you’re willing to do anything for a job:

You seem desperate
Job seekers, we understand the market is tough right now, but being desperate is never good. Be sure to express your interest in a position you want, but keep your cool and don’t reveal if your eggs are all in one basket, so to speak.

As a side note: Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. It’s hard not to be desperate when you’ve got no Plan B.

You lack a particular skill
In today’s job market, employers are looking for someone who can do a particular something, and do that something well — not someone who can (and will) do anything. Saying you will do anything for a job implies that you need to do something outside of the normal scope of the position to succeed. Maybe you’ll need to be taught the required skills before beginning work, or you’ll need to go through extensive on-the-job training.

In a tight job market, employers aren’t looking for someone “willing to learn” or “willing to do anything” — they’re looking for someone to perform right off the bat.

You’ll likely be underemployed
Imagine a former CEO working in a mailroom: now that is underemployment. This example may be extreme, but you get the idea. Underemployment is rampant, and if you say you’re willing to do anything for a job, you may just get your wish (get ready to add “mail sorter” to your PR resume).

In the short run, you may get a paid gig — but you’re nowhere closer to progressing your career and moving your life in the direction you want it to go. If you’re going to be underemployed, look for experiences that will build your resume and prepare you for your dream career.

In the end, don’t tell a potential employer that you’re “willing to do anything” for a job. Know your worth as an employee and seek jobs that match your skill set and experience. This is your career — don’t settle!

What other advice would you share with job seekers to avoid appearing desperate?

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